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Ensights

Science that is transforming lives and enabling the future

Entegris and Qosina: Expediting Single-use Bioprocess Solutions Together

Entegris and Qosina: Expediting Single-use Bioprocess Solutions Together

Have you ever needed to perform a test only to be held up by wait times for a single-use component? Perhaps you just need a small order of tubing or connectors, without everything that comes with a bulk order? We want to help customers get the right quantity of components when they need them. That’s why Entegris is proud to announce a new relationship with Qosina, a leading global supplier of OEM single-use components to the medical and pharmaceutical industries.

Creating a Future-Proof Materials Ecosystem for the $1T Semiconductor Era

Growth is good; no one in the semiconductor industry would argue this point. And according to Gartner, there’s a lot of “good” on the horizon. Current forecasts call for semiconductor sales to more than double in this decade, going from $400 billion in 2020 to $1T by 2030. With growth, however, come growing pains. To reach the heights of $1T-plus in semiconductor sales, the industry must evolve by significantly increasing not only the amount of wafers and wafer starts annually but also the amount of investment in equipment and materials. Semiconductor materials consumption during the same decade is expected to double as well. This creates great opportunity for materials suppliers, but it also will mean taking a hard look at the materials supply chain – what are the challenges, and how can they be addressed?

Is your Single-Use Solution Ready for Cell and Gene Therapy and Synthetic Gene Production?

The growth of the biomanufacturing industry has created a demand for new and high-performance fluid handling systems and technologies for the management and storage of cell and gene therapy intermediates and gene-based medicines. New modalities come with risks that don’t yet have good solutions.

New Materials: Smoothing the Transition to Molybdenum

Changing one material in the semiconductor manufacturing process has a cascading effect on multiple process steps. Consider the replacement of tungsten (W) and copper (Cu) with molybdenum (Mo). Integrated device manufacturers (IDMs) are implementing Mo in advanced designs, focusing on 2-nanometer (nm) nodes and below. Mo is highly conductive, can be deposited without a titanium or titanium nitrid

  • September 25, 2023

Not Your Average Wafer: Solving CMP Challenges in High-Volume SiC Production

Silicon carbide (SiC) has become popular with chipmakers. Its wide-bandgap structure offers many design benefits for the operations of power semiconductors. Compared to silicon, SiC wafers enable the fabrication of faster, more efficient devices that can both operate at higher temperatures and remain stable when deployed in extreme temperature environments. Processing SiC wafers using the same materials and methods as silicon wafers is not a viable option, however.

  • September 12, 2023

Avoid Powder Pitfalls and Keep Your Business Clean

Powder can be a mess when not delt with properly. Have you ever dropped a bag of flour on the floor after coming home from the store? Cleaning up the mess is terrible (speaking from experience, don’t add water or you just make glue). Now imagine doing that in a manufacturing suite with powdered media. The powder is literally designed to grow cells, so anything you miss is just a new petri dish that can generate contamination. Plus, there’s the added challenge of having to validate that the room is clean after attending to the spill.

Introducing the New Life Sciences Interactive Tool!

Entegris is delighted to announce our new interactive tool intended to help the life sciences industry better understand how we can support the entire drug manufacturing process. Our growing life sciences portfolio can be overwhelming for customers, and this simple tool helps guide them to finding all the ways we can help. The tool was designed to be versatile and can be shared by our team as part of a sales overview, or you can explore it yourself to quickly learn more about the solutions we offer.

Putting Filtration to Work for Photoresist Contamination Control

If you asked a semiconductor process engineer to name their biggest challenge when tackling the next technology node, they would likely tell you it is figuring out how to achieve high device yields. This is mainly due to an increase in possible points of contamination as the number of potential contaminants grows and their sizes shrink. It is becoming particularly difficult to detect metal contaminants and pinpoint their root cause so they can be eliminated. That’s because they can form anywhere in the process flow.

Targeted Removal: Beyond the Coffee Filter Analogy

In the early days of semiconductor manufacturing, fabs would remove contaminants from their process fluids in a sequence that could be analogized to making a cup of coffee. By using a filter with tiny pores, large contaminants (coffee grounds) are separated from water. Because the coffee grounds are too large to pass through the filter, they can’t pass into the coffee we drink.

Reducing our Environmental Impact: How We’re Making Biopharma Manufacturing More Sustainable

Biopharma manufacturing is an essential part of the healthcare industry, producing lifesaving treatments for patients around the world. Traditional manufacturing methods can have a significant environmental impact driven by stainless steel equipment requiring extensive cleaning and sterilization processes that consume substantial amounts of water and energy in addition to cleaning agents.

Achieving the Third Dimension Through Molecular Modeling

For decades, the semiconductor device manufacturing mantra was “How do we make them smaller, cheaper, and faster?” The pursuit of Moore’s Law – the doubling of transistors on a chip every two years – was achieved through planar scaling. But that approach could only go on for so long. The mantra now is “How do we improve power, performance, area, and cost (PPAC)?” At the 14 nm node, it was clear that the best way to push the limits of semiconductor device PPAC was to take it into the third dimension.

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